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July 30, 2010

The Monster 5 for Friday -- Careers Edition -- July 30

Today's post is by Ashley Melo, Monster's public relations intern:

With all the hype surrounding Ellen DeGeneres leaving American Idol, it might be time for Randy and Kara to prepare to job hunt.  These top 5 articles from the world of job seeking might help!

Here’s a look at this week's top 5 stories from the world of job seeking:

5. Interview Questions Guaranteed to Make You Hurl: Have you ever been stumped with a ridiculous interview question? Mark Jaffe recounts the tale of an advertising executive who was asked, “If you were a breakfast cereal, what kind would you be?" How would you answer?

4. Introvert or Extrovert? Tips for Job Search No Matter Which ‘Vert’ You Are: Whether you're reserved or outgoing, Erin Kennedy gives us an inside look on how to utilize your strengths as an introvert or extrovert in your job search.

3. Ace the Job Interview with "Why?" -- Not "How?" Executive career coach Meg Montford offers advice on what kinds of questions job seekers should ask during an interview.  

2. Take Advantage of Downtime at Work: Do you have some unexpected free time at work? Roberta Chinsky Matuson says to use it on one -- or all -- of these six career-boosting activities.  

1. Three Ways for Job Seekers to Gain Inside Company Information: While most candidates know how important it is to research a company before an interview, publicly available information isn’t enough to keep a job seeker above the competition. Phil Rosenberg offers three ways to get inside information about a company and get an edge.

For more must-read content, check out the Monster 5: Works Edition for this week’s top articles from the world of talent management.

Which of these was your favorite? What did we miss? Let us know in the comments below.

Posted by Katrina Kibben on July 30, 2010 at 02:00 PM in Career Development , Interview , Job Search | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

July 26, 2010

How to Use Technology to Switch Careers

Today's post is by Matt Charney, Monster Social Media Engagement Manager:

There’s no reason why work has to feel like, well, work. While it’s a tough market out there, the good news is there’s no better time than now to reinvent yourself and your career.

You’re probably well-aware of the ways job seekers are using technology to find and apply for new positions. But you might not know that the same tools can be leveraged not only to find a new job, but also to plan for a new career.
   
The prospect of switching careers can be downright scary for many job seekers; like all major changes, it requires a little planning and a lot of courage. Of course, incurring this short-term risk creates some long-term rewards, namely a long-term, rewarding career doing something you’re passionate about. 

Here are five simple steps for using technology to research potential paths and find out which career is the right one for you.

1. Get the Official Story: After identifying your strengths and natural talents, you’ll want to apply these as a filter to start researching which careers are the best fits for you. 

Monster’s new Career Snapshots tool provides official details, such as qualifications, skills and duties, for more than 2,500 careers, ranging from accountants to fashion models and everything in between. Career Snapshots also provide industry forecasts collected from thousands of job postings, offering valuable data on current and anticipated job market trends.

2.  Get the Unofficial Story: Online professional networks are a great way to learn more about a specific industry or function. Once you determine what you want to do for a living, you’ll need to prove a commitment and dedication to your chosen field, or else your dream job will remain just that. 

While most job seekers use social networks as professional marketing vehicles to connect with people in a targeted field, they also provide a great way to pick up industry knowledge, terminology and trends. 

Monster Communities feature a variety of unique professional networks aligning with various job functions and industries, such as marketing, human resources and healthcare to help connect better. Participating in online communities provides opportunities to learn more about industry and professional trends, engage with influencers and employers, and expand your network simultaneously.

3. See How You Compare: Monster recently introduced Career Benchmarking, a cutting-edge resource that shows job seekers how they compare with their peers. Featuring a wide variety of topics, ranging from compensation to commute times, Career Benchmarking compares your information against local and national averages for thousands of unique job titles. The data provided is priceless; fortunately, Monster offers this powerful tool for free to all job seekers.

4. Read Job Listings: Using a job board like Monster to access and read job descriptions also provides valuable insight into building a long-term strategy for your new career. Browsing for postings in a targeted function or industry helps give a good sense of the experience, training and skills you’ll be expected to have as well as the recurring responsibilities involved in day-to-day work.

5. Make a Choice: Be sure you have strong, valid reasons to change careers; doing so might mean drastic changes in self-perception, working environment, income, work-life balance, healthcare benefits and a myriad of other considerations. 

You have to be able to state your case effectively, clearly and passionately as to why you’re picking a new career and what you hope to gain from the change. Incorporating this message into your social profiles and personal brand is critical, and an easy way to advertise your decision (and availability) to your network, both online and off.

If you’re having trouble creating a compelling case about why you’re making the move, you might be better off exploring another path or focusing on advancing your current career. While technology can help with exploring new careers, it can’t decide which path is right for you. That’s your job.

Posted by Katrina Kibben on July 26, 2010 at 10:33 AM in Career Development , Careers at 50+ , Job Search , Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

July 23, 2010

The Monster 5 for Friday -- Careers Edition -- July 23

Last weekend, “Inception” conquered the box office, even if no one really understood what the film was about...something about investigating dreams. If you're having nightmares about work, you might want to give yourself a wake-up call by reading these top job search advice articles and investigating your own dream…job, that is. 

Here are the top 5 stories from the world of job seeking you might have missed:

5. Job Search Consultants: Let’s Get a Different Perspective: There are two sides to every story in the job seeker and recruiter relationship. Gayle Howard portrays the recruiter's side to give you, the job seeker, a better understanding of what gets their attention (in a bad way). 

4. Moving Without a Job? Try These Five Strategies: When looking for a position in a new location, job seekers typically look for work sooner rather than later. By the time you pack up to move, you want to know your salary, your new boss and even the date you'll be starting. Here are five tips from Allan Hoffman for anyone planning to take the bold step of moving without a job lined up.

3. Why NOW is the Best Time to Write Your Resume: Panic mode is not the frame of mind to be in to rewrite your resume. Check out these tips from Jessica Holbrook Hernandez on staying prepared for your next job search by maintaining your resume while you’re still employed.

2. Boundary Setting and Gut-Checks for Job Seekers from LaTimesDaily.com: You get a call for an out-of-town interview but are having trouble figuring out the details -- flight, hotel, etc. -- so you’re on time and prepared to meet the team. Liz Ryan explains how to manage the situation so you’re at your best for the interview.

1. The Chocolate Roses & Hot Pink Paper Fail from Louise Fletcher: Using all the bells and whistles to find your next job? Stop with the chocolate roses and hot pink resumes and learn how to be effectively creative.

For more must-read content, check out the Monster 5: Works Edition for this week’s top articles from the world of talent management.

Which of these was your favorite? What did we miss? Let us know in the comments below.

Posted by Katrina Kibben on July 23, 2010 at 01:07 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

July 16, 2010

The Monster 5 for Friday -- Careers Edition -- July 16

This week, you saw baseball's A-list players in the MLB All-Star game and Home Run Derby. Become an all star in your job search with our Monster 5 for Friday -- five articles we consider must-reads for job seekers this week. 

Here are the top 5 stories from the world of job seeking you might have missed:

5. On Life: 5 Things Returning Home Has Done for Me: Moving back home with your parents? Don’t be ashamed. Kristen Jeffers tells you what you can learn from the experience.

4. How to Get the Salary You Want by Joe Light on WallStreetJournal .com: To get the top compensation possible in your job search -- without putting a sour taste in your potential employer's mouth -- take these steps.

3. The Science of Google Web Presence: We’ve heard the message loud and clear. Employers are using social media and Google to screen candidates. But what if you don’t like what they find when they Google you? Emily Bennington tells you how to manage your online reputation. 

2. Should I Get a Raise for Taking on More Work? Your coworker has given notice and your company is under a hiring freeze. That means you need to take on more work. Shouldn’t more work mean more money? Alison Green shows you how to make the most of the situation. 

1. Top 10 Tips for Getting Your Dream Job: Take this 10-question quiz by Bill Knaus, EdD, to see if you have the skills to pursue your dream job.

For more must-read content, check out the Monster 5: Works Edition for this week’s top articles from the world of talent management.

Which of these was your favorite? What did we miss? Let us know in the comments below.

Posted by Katrina Kibben on July 16, 2010 at 12:03 PM in Job Search | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

July 13, 2010

Career Advice for New Grads in 140 Characters

Congratulations! You’ve recently graduated from college. And in the fine words of Dr. Seuss, “Oh the places you’ll go!” Except you're not there yet, because it's July and you still don’t have a job. You’re not alone -- the reality is that 8 percent of college grads under age 25 are still job searching

With all of the competition for entry-level jobs, we reached out to our Twitter community to ask what advice they would give college grads still on the job hunt. In 140 characters or so, career experts and new grads from across the country gave us some new and interesting tips:

@MeghanMBiro: Make the absolute most of internships. Find a mentor(s) - listen closely, ask ?'s. The career search is a full-time role.

@HRmajesty: #1 advice...Get rid of the cutesy e-mail (sexygirl69@hotmail.com) and use something more professional (your.name@gmail.com)

@phyllismufson: I'd like to see every parent give their graduating sr. a graduation gift of career coaching. It's criminal what these kids don't know.

@cargillcreative: My tip for college grads would be to join Toastmasters and develop a great set of public speaking skills.

@Red_Inc: Everyone LOVES to help fresh-eyed college grads. Network with anyone and everyone! Spread the word!

@EmilyBennington: Volunteer! Will help grow your network, allow others to see you in action, and develop your leadership skills @ same time.

@JackieLennartz: If recent grads can't find permanent work, they could consider doing internships. Great way to gain experience and network.

@Deferocoach: Reconnect w/ past professors. They often have inside info on new positions in a particular industry, you just need to ask!

@saran28: Learn to use the latest tools/technology in your field. That is what I am doing.

For more valuable tips and job search advice, follow Monster Career Advice on Twitter and check out MonsterCollege, the top job network for college students and recent grads.

Posted by Katrina Kibben on July 13, 2010 at 02:17 PM in Job Search | Permalink | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

July 09, 2010

The Monster 5 for Friday -- Careers Edition -- July 9

We're back again this Friday to spotlight the five best career advice articles we've read this week. 

Here are the top 5 stories from the world of job seeking you might have missed:

5. 4 Questions to Ask When You Want to Quit Your Job: We’ve all had those days -- you’re frustrated with your manager, your meetings seem to last forever and you want nothing more than to just quit your job. Curt Rosengren shows you how to put things in perspective when you want to walk.

4. Unemployed? Try Brushing Up on Your Math Skills by Suzanne Lucas: Want help finding a job?  Try using your math skills to get hired and get ahead. 

3. I'm Graduating with the Wrong Degree -- Now What? You now realize that you got the wrong degree to get the job you want. Peter Vogt explains how you can apply your wrong degree to the right career.

2. 4 Tips to Answering Tough Interview Questions Correctly: The interview is crucial to getting hired. Impress your interviewer by following Rob Taub’s guidelines on the CareeRealism blog.

1. 75 Reasons You Didn’t Get the Job: Interviewing is subjective. In this guest post for the Matrix Wall blog, Stephanie Lloyd explains how to self-assess and prepare for your next interview.

For more must-read content, check out the Monster 5: Works Edition for this week’s top articles from the world of talent management.

Which of these was your favorite? What did we miss? Let us know in the comments below.

Posted by Katrina Kibben on July 9, 2010 at 02:00 PM in Job Search | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

July 02, 2010

The Monster 5 for Friday -- Careers Edition -- July 2

It’s Friday, and we’re spotlighting five more articles we consider to be must-reads for job seekers this week. 

Here are the top 5 stories from the world of job seeking you might have missed:

5. How to Get a New Job When You've Been Fired: Does getting fired mean you’ll never find a new job? Suzanne Lucas dispels the myths about getting a job after you’ve been terminated.

4. The Downfall of a Blogger and What It Means for You: Think what you say online is private? Think again. Louise Fletcher explains how a false sense of privacy led to the firing of a blogger and what you can do to avoid a similar situation.

3. Too Many Chiefs: “Chief know it all”, “scrum master” and “guru” are becoming common job titles but how does your label affect job security and, long term, your career? The Economist dives into this controversial topic.

2. How Much Will a Career Change Cost You? A new job in a different industry may reenergize your career, but it can also empty your wallet. Dona DeZube tells you what financial implications to consider.

1. How to Stand Out As an Intern…Sort Of: Are you an intern? Want to stand out? Trevor Wilson highlights a Cisco intern who’s rhyming his way to a new job.

Which of these was your favorite? What did we miss? Let us know in the comments below. And for more must-read content, check out the Monster 5: Works Edition for this week’s top articles from the world of talent management.

Posted by Katrina Kibben on July 2, 2010 at 02:00 PM in Job Search | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)